Mercurial Musings

I read. I write. I think. I share.

Every introvert alive knows the exquisite pleasure of stepping from the clamor of a party into the bathroom and closing the door.

—Sophia Dembling - The Introvert’s Way: Living a Quiet Life in a Noisy World (via murkygin)

(Source: cumbered-cat, via johnpaulbrammer)

sixpenceee:

Famous Failures

I stumbled upon this video a long time ago and it honestly made me feel a lot better.

"If you’ve never failed, you’ve never lived."

I could not fit everyone mentioned in the video in this post so be sure to give the video a look.

WATCH IT HERE

(via laurendestefano)

dontclaimgucci:

shout out to people who are scared to call others out, whose hands shake when they try to explain what’s wrong, whose throats threaten to close up with thoughts of ‘what if i’m just overreacting’, whose hearts are pounding out of their chests because they just stuck their necks out for their beliefs, who have lost friends and respect and safety for aligning themselves with causes

(via lespirit)

malindalo:

This pamphlet asks, “Is College Bad for Girls?”
It examines:
"Evils of Dormitory Life—Midnight Hours of Who Knows What?"
"Flirting & Speaking to Male Students without Proper Introductions & Chaperone."
"Reading Improper Novels, Magazines, & Other Suggestive Literature."
"Forming of Unladylike Habits that May Harm the Health & Morals of a delicate Girl—Such as Smoking & Card Playing."

malindalo:

This pamphlet asks, “Is College Bad for Girls?

It examines:

  • "Evils of Dormitory Life—Midnight Hours of Who Knows What?"
  • "Flirting & Speaking to Male Students without Proper Introductions & Chaperone."
  • "Reading Improper Novels, Magazines, & Other Suggestive Literature."
  • "Forming of Unladylike Habits that May Harm the Health & Morals of a delicate Girl—Such as Smoking & Card Playing."

Anonymous asked: loving my illusions of fate arc...but why is the cover white when jessmin isn't?

malindalo:

kierstenwhite:

This…is an interesting question.

My publisher was very aware of Jessamin being a POC character. The model they used is Polynesian (and probably the most beautiful woman I’ve ever seen, but that’s neither here nor there), and they were very careful with the coloring because we didn’t want her washed out. But the lighting is really intense around the teacup, so I can see how her skin tone could be confused.

So, I don’t really have an answer for you, other than that my publisher definitely made no attempt to whitewash Jessamin or her story. The visual emphasis is supposed to be the teacup, thus the bright lighting focusing on that portion of the cover.

This is SUCH an interesting question, and it illustrates something I’ve been thinking about for awhile: the idea (that arises in many discussions of book covers, particularly) that representations of people of color must appear a certain way in order to be read as people of color. The fact, is not all people of color are read as people of color in the real world — sometimes people of color pass as white*, but that doesn’t mean they are white. Basically, being a “person of color” doesn’t necessarily mean your skin is noticeably darker than “white” (and what is “white” anyway?), and it’s important to remember that.

Racial and ethnic identity is more than skin deep. It’s about culture, lived experience, history. It’s complicated, and often impossible to express in a flat, two-dimensional image.

* Edited to add: Sometimes a person passes as white only to certain other people. Whether you recognize someone as [insert ethnic identity] often depends on your own lived experience and ethnic identity. E.g., Chinese people often notice that I am not 100% Chinese (I’m 1/4 white), but I’ve never had a white person notice that (or, at least, tell me they noticed).

malindalo:

hollyblack:

ivegotthekittens:

malindalo:

From today on Twitter: I often see “I wish [bestselling writer] would include POC/LGBT characters!” But There are other writers who do this. Support them.

So, you’re suggesting I read books by authors I do not like, and/or that deals with subjects I am not interested in, simply because it has a PoC/LGBT character? 
I wish certain authors would have diverse characters because these are the ones writing books I’m actually going to read. 
And I wish bestselling artists would because no matter what their next book going to be about, it would get many readers and a lot of publicity. 
Can you imagine what it would have been like for PoC and LGBT to have their group represented as one of the trio in Harry Potter? Or even just make Dumbledore openly and obviously gay? 
This is what we need. It’s not that the public isn’t aware such people exists, but they are never in the mainstream media. Correct me if I’m wrong, but seems to me this is what all those PoC justice posts are preaching. 
And best selling authors are the main streams of books, so we want them to include these characters. 

Seriously? Do you honestly believe that bestselling books are anointed and raised up by some divine hand? Like THE CLAW HAS CHOSEN? And for some reason the claw keeps choosing straight white cisgendered protagonists written by straight white cisgendered authors? REALLY?
Best selling authors don’t just HAPPEN to be in the mainstream media. Selling a lot of books MAKES someone a bestselling author and GETS mainstream media attention. But books are sold one at a time to readers who make choices about which books they want to support.
If you want more diversity, you have to buy more diversely.
And, look, I love me and I want everyone to read all my books all the time, but reading a book with a diverse cast written by JK Rowling or myself or any other white straight cisgendered writer isn’t the same as reading a book written by a person of color or a LGBTQ+ writer. It’s the difference between a secondary source and a primary source. But if you feel that FOR SOME REASON you can be absolutely sure that you’re not going to like a book you haven’t read because it isn’t already a bestseller, then I guess that’s you, but please, please, please don’t act like it’s some kind of positive political act.
And don’t you dare talk that way to Malinda.
 

Awww Holly! <3
To answer ivegotthekittens’s question, no of course I’m not suggesting you read books you’re not interested in! I’m saying that if you’re looking for books with LGBT characters, THEY ALREADY EXIST. But often you  have to look BEYOND the bestseller list, because bestsellers tend to cater to and create the mainstream, and the mainstream is pretty darn straight.
What I’m saying is: Step outside the bestseller box once in a while. There are millions of other books out there, and many of them already have LGBT characters in them, even if they’re not written by [bestselling author]. I’m pretty sure you will like some of them.
(But also you should totally read all of Holly’s books! I’m currently reading an advance copy of her next book, The Darkest Part of the Forest and one of the main characters is gay and it is beautifully written and mysterious and creepy — all good things.)

malindalo:

hollyblack:

ivegotthekittens:

malindalo:

From today on Twitter: I often see “I wish [bestselling writer] would include POC/LGBT characters!” But There are other writers who do this. Support them.

So, you’re suggesting I read books by authors I do not like, and/or that deals with subjects I am not interested in, simply because it has a PoC/LGBT character? 

I wish certain authors would have diverse characters because these are the ones writing books I’m actually going to read. 

And I wish bestselling artists would because no matter what their next book going to be about, it would get many readers and a lot of publicity. 

Can you imagine what it would have been like for PoC and LGBT to have their group represented as one of the trio in Harry Potter? Or even just make Dumbledore openly and obviously gay? 

This is what we need. It’s not that the public isn’t aware such people exists, but they are never in the mainstream media. Correct me if I’m wrong, but seems to me this is what all those PoC justice posts are preaching. 

And best selling authors are the main streams of books, so we want them to include these characters. 

Seriously? Do you honestly believe that bestselling books are anointed and raised up by some divine hand? Like THE CLAW HAS CHOSEN? And for some reason the claw keeps choosing straight white cisgendered protagonists written by straight white cisgendered authors? REALLY?

Best selling authors don’t just HAPPEN to be in the mainstream media. Selling a lot of books MAKES someone a bestselling author and GETS mainstream media attention. But books are sold one at a time to readers who make choices about which books they want to support.

If you want more diversity, you have to buy more diversely.

And, look, I love me and I want everyone to read all my books all the time, but reading a book with a diverse cast written by JK Rowling or myself or any other white straight cisgendered writer isn’t the same as reading a book written by a person of color or a LGBTQ+ writer. It’s the difference between a secondary source and a primary source. But if you feel that FOR SOME REASON you can be absolutely sure that you’re not going to like a book you haven’t read because it isn’t already a bestseller, then I guess that’s you, but please, please, please don’t act like it’s some kind of positive political act.

And don’t you dare talk that way to Malinda.

 

Awww Holly! <3

To answer ivegotthekittens’s question, no of course I’m not suggesting you read books you’re not interested in! I’m saying that if you’re looking for books with LGBT characters, THEY ALREADY EXIST. But often you  have to look BEYOND the bestseller list, because bestsellers tend to cater to and create the mainstream, and the mainstream is pretty darn straight.

What I’m saying is: Step outside the bestseller box once in a while. There are millions of other books out there, and many of them already have LGBT characters in them, even if they’re not written by [bestselling author]. I’m pretty sure you will like some of them.

(But also you should totally read all of Holly’s books! I’m currently reading an advance copy of her next book, The Darkest Part of the Forest and one of the main characters is gay and it is beautifully written and mysterious and creepy — all good things.)

Teachers: Beware of Pinterest

teachersbewareofpinterest:

It is back to school time which means much excitement and many busy days ahead for teachers, students, and parents. Teachers are busy preparing their classrooms for the new school year and students begin to slowly release attachment to summer; replacing swimming and sleepovers with shopping for…

asylum-art:

Daniel Merriam

If Hieronymus Bosch took the blue pill instead and sat down to a mad hatters tea party with Marie Antoinette, a hookah-smoking Caterpillar & a couple of unicorns you may just open the curtain into Daniel Merriam’s theatre fantastic. A Master American Surrealist painter, his worlds speak to those of us who adored the movie The Labyrinth and found ourselves asking, Why the hell wouldn’t she stay with the Goblin King? It’s firmly the territory of a child’s bubblegum mind.

(via aladyandhertardis)

sktagg23:

Reblogging this in honor of Robin Williams. Please, if you are battling depression or suicidal thoughts, I desperately urge you to talk to someone. I will listen, and so will the people at this number.

sktagg23:

Reblogging this in honor of Robin Williams. Please, if you are battling depression or suicidal thoughts, I desperately urge you to talk to someone. I will listen, and so will the people at this number.

(Source: weheartit.com, via aladyandhertardis)

bethrevis:

laurendestefano:

how long before we as a society accept that something doesn’t have to show up on a blood test or body scan to be an illness?

Mental health is just as important as physical health; it’s just so often ignored by everyone.

This.

(via aladyandhertardis)

thatzak:

If anything comes from Robin Williams’ death, I hope it brings more awareness to depression. Even someone so outwardly upbeat and full of life can succumb to depression.

(via aladyandhertardis)

crossmycrutch asked: When did you first notice your depression and anxiety and what made you seek help?

laurendestefano:

I had my first panic attack when I was six or so. I thought, mistakenly, that it was asthma and so did my parents. Over the years, my anxiety manifested into headaches and stomach aches, and I had ultrasounds and CT scans done spanning the time from then until I was about 12 or 13 or so.

Nothing ever came up, but during an appointment with my pediatrician he asked me for some examples of when I started to feel sick. In every case, it was when I was feeling stressed out or unhappy. He recommended that I meet with a counselor. My mother took offense and told me that therapy was for psychopaths. I don’t think she understood what she was saying or what was going on, but after that I clammed up and kept it to myself throughout high school and some of college. It manifested into OCD also. If I tried to fight the anxiety and calm myself down, something would tell me that the house would burn down or my parents would die if I didn’t open and close the window in multiples. It always came in waves and passed eventually, so I would ride it out.

I didn’t really seek help until college when it just started to be crushing. I went to therapy unmedicated for a year on and off, and went back as needed when it flared up again. The older you get, the bigger your problems, and the bigger the emotional magnitude with which you feel them. And the more you learn about the world, and the smarter you get, the smarter it gets. It can’t be talked out sometimes. It sees your fears and triples them. I didn’t start taking medication until about a year ago, but it’s just lorazepam (equivalent to xanax) that I only take if I’m feeling overwhelmed. I try not to take it if I can get by without it, but I always keep it on me and it helps just to know it’s there.